The penalty for drink driving

 

Drink driving is defined in law as driving or attempting to drive a motor vehicle whilst having alcohol levels above the permitted limit. The limits described in law are 35 micrograms per 100 milligrams of breath, or 80 milligrams per 100 millilitres of blood. The exact manner in which these numbers translate in actual amounts of alcohol consumed depends on individual characteristics such as body weight. However as a rough guide, men reach this level after consuming one and a half pints of regular beer, and women after a pint.

If you are found guilty of the offence, the drink-driving penalty is an automatic 12-month suspension of your licence. Additionally, a fine of up to Level 5 (£5,000) can be levied against you, and you could also be subject to as much as 6 months’ imprisonment.

The drink-driving penalty becomes more severe on a second conviction (when it is within ten years of the first) as the mandatory disqualification of the licence is for at least three years.

If you are currently being charged with drink driving you should probably discuss your case with a legal professional. Motoring solicitors specialise in these cases and they are aware of all the rules, guidelines and rights that are material to your case. For example, if you are accused because of a breath test that resulted in a barely positive outcome (e.g. 40 micrograms) you may have the right to request a second test. Hiring a solicitor will ensure you are not wrongly convicted and that your case is properly represented.

If you would like to obtain legal advice on the drink-driving penalty, Caven can put you in touch with a local criminal / DUI solicitor free of charge. So, if you have any questions or would like our help in finding local criminal / DUI solicitors please call us on 08001 221 2299 or complete the web-form above.

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