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University concedes sex discrimination case to male workers

In what is a twist on the traditional assumption in sex discrimination cases, twenty-three men have been successful in their £500,000 claim against a Welsh university.

The men originally worked as tradesmen and caretakers at Swansea Metropolitan University, which merged with the University of Wales Trinity St David (UWTSD).

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The ramifications of the Government’s criminal legal aid cuts exposed by Cameron’s brother

A serious fraud trial has today (01 May 2014) been halted due to the judge deciding that there was no prospect of a fair trial.

The reasoning is that the defendants will not be adequately represented because no barristers agreed to take on the case.

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Early conciliation for employment disputes is being made a legal requirement on 6 May 2014, but what exactly is it?

There have been a lot of changes made to employment law recently, mainly with the aim of improving efficiency, reducing the number of spurious cases and ultimately saving the government money.

The latest is the introduction of Early Conciliation, a new requirement that must take place before any claim is made to the employment tribunal.

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Prince Charles’ letters: a political and legal drama

The recent (March 2014) saga of Prince Charles’ letters to the UK Government is intriguing from a political perspective, and throws up issues going to the heart of UK constitutional law.

Why is it so important to know what Prince Charles has been writing?

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Rough Justice: Internet vigilantes and the right to privacy

In 2011 a Dublin taxi driver, aggrieved after a passenger ran off without paying, posted a YouTube video of the event. He asked users to identify the young man in the grainy footage, whom another passenger could be heard calling “Eoin”.

An anonymous individual identified the culprit as Eoin McKeogh, a young student at Dublin City University.

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Could no-win, no-fee agreements be on their way out?

Concerns are mounting over no-win, no-fee agreements after a Legal Ombudsman’s report in late January 2014 highlighted abusive practices by some solicitors.

In 2013 lawyers were ordered to pay nearly £1 million in compensation to clients after agreements went wrong.

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Mass solicitor and barrister walkout against Government legal aid fee cuts

For the first time ever barristers across England and Wales have staged a refusal to work in the criminal courts, to raise the issue of the Government’s plans to cut legal aid fees by up to 30%.

They are being joined by solicitors, in what is also an unprecedented move, as they seek to highlight the two major issues at stake – the cutting of fees for legal aid work, and the belief that this will lead to poorer quality legal representation for those people not able to pay privately.

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Marriage is a shared partnership, right? Maybe not if you have ‘ugly’ kids…

An unusual family law case from China recently surfaced in a number of new sources.

According to the reports, Jian Fang was “horrified” at how ugly his and his beautiful wife’s newborn daughter was.

He initially refused to believe the child was his, which led to his wife admitting having had extensive plastic surgery in South Korea before they met.

Apparently Fang sued his now ex-wife for false pretences and won, with the judge ordering her to pay several thousand pounds in compensation.

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Are whistleblowers protected enough?

Whistleblowing is a situation in which someone reports wrongdoing at their workplace. This could relate to things like law-breaking, environmental damage, health and safety concerns, or dishonesty.

It is widely recognised to be in the public interest for workers to be able to make disclosures of this nature. However, recent reports suggest that not enough is being done to protect and encourage whistleblowers, especially in the teaching profession.

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Serious sentence for medical negligence

In early November 2013 consultant surgeon David Sellu was convicted of manslaughter by gross negligence and sentenced to two and a half years in prison.

When presented with a patient suffering from severe abdominal pains, Sellu suspected a ruptured bowel but delayed in prescribing antibiotics and doing abdominal scans. The patient, James Hughes, went on to die and the court found that he would have stood a higher chance of surviving had Sellu treated him with the appropriate urgency.

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The Caven Blog covers topics that relate to UK citizens most. The scope of our blog mostly covers legal issues in the UK, but also extends to important EU and international legal topics.

As well as current affairs, we cover common everyday issues raised by our readers, such as the basics on family law, employment rights, property purchases, landlord and tenancy disputes, small business issues and motoring offences.

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